Tackling Hazardous Waste Changes – How Will They Impact Construction?

It can be a real challenge keeping up with the ever-changing rules and regulations around waste legislation. Failure to comply can result in significant fines or even criminal prosecution. Reconomy takes two aspects of hazardous waste regulations that have changed in recent months.

You’ve got to be on the ball when complying with waste legislation. Unlike a football match, it’s not a game of two halves. It’s one where you have to be on your toes for the whole match. Drop the ball and the penalties are punitive. It can be a real challenge keeping up with the ever-growing rules and regulations.

But there is some good news from the sidelines. Two aspects of the Hazardous Waste Regulations have changed in the last quarter. The first is less paperwork (I can hear you cheering from the stands). The second is the format of the unique consignment note code. You may not think these are major changes and you would be right. Nevertheless they are changes you have to keep up with if you don’t want to receive a red card.

So now:

* If you produce or store 500kg or more of hazardous waste per year you will no longer need to register your premises with the Environment Agency provided you are in England. If you are in Wales you should continue to register with Natural Resources Wales.

* You still have to complete a consignment note code (if the waste is produced in England) but instead of the premises registration number you should put the first six letters or numbers (not symbols) of the business name.

Read the full blog here

Resin 16 Apprentices Take Final Training Module

Apprentices from the 16th resin flooring group thoroughly enjoyed their final training session – run by FeRFA trainer Terry Foxley and Andy Hill from PFT Central.

Everyone had the opportunity to handle the specialist pumping equipment used for the application of the flowable screed and were guided through each step of the process of mixing and laying pumped screeds. The group were shown the correct setting up procedure of the M-tec mixing pump, preparation of the floor area, setting levels, how to carry out flow tests and safe operation of the pump.

Instarmac kindly supplied all the materials as well as hosting the two-day session at the Tamworth headquarters. The apprentices will continue their training gaining on-site supervised experience with their employers, all of which will be logged in preparation for their assessment with Kevin Cook and Mike Squirrell.

The apprentices in Resin group 16 are: Daniel McLaughlin and Jordan Speed (4m Floors UK), Matthew Marvin and Adam Moore (Central Flooring), Danny Malone (Coatech Ltd), Jack Findlay (Genco Construction), Jason Earl (IRL Group Ltd)

View Press Release

Apprentices get well prepared at lastest training

Resin 18 apprentices had plenty of opportunity to try a range of machines this month at The Preparation Group’s training facility in Lincoln.

FeRFA Trainer, Stephen Walker, who ran the two day sessions, began by going through the essential techniques of proper floor preparation and continued, through a combination of classroom teaching and practical experience, with the various methods of surface preparation and the choice of equipment available.

This group has now completed the first ten modules of their two year apprenticeship and will continue their training with further combined classroom and practical sessions on Coatings, Self smoothing, Screeds & Covings and Flowable Screeds.

Apprentices in Resin 18 are: Craig Bowden (Britannia Industrial Flooring Ltd), Jordan Kingston (Coatech Ltd), Craig MacGregor and Phillip Rockett (Euro Resin), Meshach Barrow and Daniel Dainty (John Lord & Son Ltd), Michael Hutchinson, Philip Whitehall, Darren Collinson and Robert Rochford (Polydeck Resins Ltd), Lewis Pearce (Ryebrook Resins Flooring Ltd), Brendan Thomas (Stonhard UK Ltd) and Joe Walters (Top Team UK Ltd)

Tackling Hazardous Waste Changes – How Will They Impact Construction?

You’ve got to be on the ball when complying with waste legislation. Unlike a football match, it’s not a game of two halves. It’s one where you have to be on your toes for the whole match. Drop the ball and the penalties are punitive.

It can be a real challenge keeping up with the ever-growing rules and regulations.

But there is some good news from the sidelines. Two aspects of the Hazardous Waste Regulations have changed in the last quarter. The first is less paperwork (I can hear you cheering from the stands). The second is the format of the unique consignment note code. You may not think these are major changes and you would be right. Nevertheless they are changes you have to keep up with if you don’t want to receive a red card.

So now: * If you produce or store 500kg or more of hazardous waste per year you will no longer need to register your premises with the Environment Agency provided you are in England. If you are in Wales you should continue to register with Natural Resources Wales.

* You still have to complete a consignment note code (if the waste is produced in England) but instead of the premises registration number you should put the first six letters or numbers (not symbols) of the business name.

For more information visit: here

How Can PAS 402 Help Reduce Waste in Your Building Project

Through the creation of PAS 402, everyone in the industry can now have confidence that the construction and demolition material that goes into a skip and leaves a site will be handled according to a strict standard.

Developed in conjunction with the British Standards Institution (BSI), the specification requires waste management firms to demonstrate performance in a number of key areas of waste management, including landfill diversion and materials recovery.

It means that as a construction firm you have verifiable and authoritative information to hand when you undertake a waste management audit for a new building project. This will make it easier to assess the right contractor for the job and give you a greater chance of achieving the best and most cost-effective levels of recycling and reuse.

To read more click on the link here